biking

A Wheel Good Time: How to Pick the Perfect Bike and Helmet for Your Kid

Written on December 18, 2014 at 11:21 am , by

Girl on bikeAt some point in time, almost every kid gets a two-wheeler for the holidays. It’s a gift that can keep on giving through spring, summer, fall and beyond, as long as you pay attention to a few key details that allow for an enjoyable ride. That’s where the experts—Pacific Cycle‘s Terry Collins, vice president of sales, and Joe Werwie, global director of product development—chime in. Follow their advice for finding the best bike and helmet for your teen or tween to pedal with pride.

For the bicycle…

Size It Right
Many parents opt for a larger ride, thinking their son or daughter will grow into it. The problem with that approach: Bikes become much more difficult to handle when they’re a size too big, and that can diminish a kid’s confidence on two wheels. Avoid this by heading to the bike shop knowing your child’s exact height. That way a pro can help you pick the ideal frame or you can base it on the retailer’s sizing chart.

Determine the Terrain
The second most important info you need before purchasing is where your child will ride. If he or she plans to pedal mostly on paved roads, a thinner tire is ideal, whereas a wider one works best on gravel or trails, since it’ll have a better grip on rough surfaces. Also consider whether your kid will have to carry the bike up and down steps—a lighter model makes that much easier.

Get Set Up
Before your child starts spinning, hold the front of the bike steady and have him or her sit on it. Crank the right pedal to its lowest position and make sure your kid’s heel rests on it. If the knee is bent, raise the seat so that it’s straight. If the foot doesn’t touch the pedal, lower the saddle until the heel makes contact. The handlebars should be adjusted to a comfortable riding position that balances the pressure on your child’s upper body and lower half. The rider’s hands, arms, shoulders, back and neck should feel relaxed and natural.

For the helmet…

Find a good fit
Helmet size is usually listed by age, but if you want an exact fit, it’s best to bring your kid along to the store. (A helmet’s tightness is most important for safety.) Most options will have a dial in the back for adjustments, so use that to ensure security. Kids can test the snugness by rocking their heads forward and backward—doing so shouldn’t shake the helmet. Or put your hands on top and try to move it front to back and side to side, and modify accordingly if it budges.

Place properly
Many riders wear their helmets too far back on the head, with the front pointing upward, but it should really face straight forward. Aim for the front edge to be about one inch above the eyebrow. As for the straps, they should form a triangle around the ear, coming together below the earlobe. Tighten these so they’re directly under the chin and not swaying freely.

What Motivates a Doctor Mom to Work Out?

Written on August 13, 2013 at 12:24 pm , by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In our September “Dr. Mom Knows Best” feature, internist Katherine Chretien, M.D., offered smart advice on making a nutritious dinner in a pinch, the #1 thing you can do for your health and more. For this guest post, Dr. Chretien reveals what inspires her to exercise. And it’s probably not what you think.

I lost my regular exercise motivation for the same reason I lost the will to wash and blow-dry my hair every day: pregnancy. Was it the fatigue or the mobility of a beached whale? I’m not sure I’ll ever know. But I do know that my once-regular habit of exercising several times a week went missing and I didn’t go looking for it.

Meanwhile, my husband, also a doctor, is a bit of the overachiever when it comes to exercise. He’s run many marathons and even competed in a couple of IRONMAN triathlons (that’s code for races for the insane). He had been trying to get me back into some kind of regular exercise for years. Not because I let myself go—at least I hope not—but because he felt it was important for my health. After all, he would be the one pushing me around in a wheelchair someday. I agreed in theory, but when, pray tell, would I exercise in between caring for all these kids and working? The whole idea sounded unpleasant, if not impossible.

Then one day, I came across research that showed people who engaged in regular exercise were less likely to develop dementia. As an internist who takes care of hospitalized patients, many of whom are elderly, I am terrified of developing dementia and not knowing where I am, who I am or what decade I’m living in. Sure, there are sweet-as-pie patients with dementia, “pleasantly confused,” as they are often described. But there are also mean ones who try to take out the staff with cans of Ensure, as if they’re at a booth at a county fair. If exercise can stave off dementia, please pass my sneakers.

So, I decided it was time to get back into the exercise habit. I started S-L-O-W, riding the recumbent bike at the gym while reading guilty pleasure celebrity magazines a few times a week. I didn’t sweat a single drop, mind you, but it felt somewhat nice to be moving with purpose. I further motivated myself by purchasing a few cute new workout outfits to replace the tent-like leftover maternity yoga tops I had been wearing.

It’s been a couple of months now, and I’ve progressed to running a few miles a few times a week. Don’t get me wrong: an elderly person using a walker might lap me, but I’m sweating now and getting a serious workout. It feels GREAT. I’m making time for it and hoping this habit sticks (and dementia doesn’t). The added benefits of a healthy heart and stress reduction are nice bonuses. More importantly, I feel like I’m making regular deposits in the long-term investment that is me. Body and mind.

Need motivation to get exercising again? Visit a local nursing home. It worked for me.

 

How do you keep yourself motivated to work out? Post a comment and let me know!

 

Katherine Chretien, M.D., is an internist, mother of three and associate professor of medicine at George Washington University. She is editor/founder of the group blog, Mothers in Medicine (www.mothersinmedicine.com) and runs very slowly.

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