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7 Healthy Salads

Try a fresh spin on dinner with a hearty, main-dish salad.

By Michael Tyrrell

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Bean & Cherry Tomato Spinach Salad
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
By Tina Rupp
iStockphoto
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Bean & Cherry Tomato Spinach Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

Microwave: 1 minute

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Greek Bulgur Salad with Shrimp

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

Refrigerate: 1 hour

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Tuna Caesar Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

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Mango Chicken Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

Refrigerate: 1 hour

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Tex-Mex Surimi Rice Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

Microwave: 2 minutes

Made from Alaskan pollock mixed with other ingredients to mimic the taste and texture of crab legs, surimi is an economical substitute best used in salads.

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Chicken Waldorf Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 10 minutes

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Roast Beef Fajita Salad

Makes: 4 servings

Prep: 15 minutes

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Salad Tips

Save Money

Create your own salad blend: 1/3 peppery greens similar to arugula, 1/3 bitter greens like frisée, and 1/3 leafy greens such as romaine. Heighten the flavor with fresh herbs, including chervil, dill, parsley and cilantro.

Mix It Up

Think beyond iceberg and leafy lettuces—today's supermarkets carry an almost overwhelming assortment of greens. Here are a few to swap in next time you're in a salad rut.

Frisée: Also known as curly endive or chicory, the yellow-and-green curled leaves are crunchy with a slightly bitter taste.
Radicchio: Reddish-purple with streaks of white, the head's spicy and bitter leaves mellow when cooked.
Arugula: These peppery leaves (also known as rocket) are native to the Mediterranean region.
Kale: A relative of cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli, the mildly bitter leaves feature a combination of violet, brown and greenish hues.
Watercress: The small tangy, peppery leaves have fibrous stems and are sold in bunches.
Escarole: The hearty, pale green plant is less bitter than its relative, frisée, and can be eaten raw or gently cooked.

Extra, Extra

These additions bring more oomph to your salad without loads of calories.

—Sliced radishes
—Cauliflower or broccoli florets
—Hearts of palm
—Hard-boiled egg whites
—Cooked artichoke hearts
—Roasted pumpkin or sunflower seeds (without salt)
—Asparagus tips
—Edamame
—Raw wild mushrooms
—Roasted eggplant
—Hummus
—Sun-dried tomatoes

Originally published in the July 2011 issue of Family Circle magazine.

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