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College Prep

College applications, scholarships and interviews, oh my! Here's expert advice on how to navigate the college prep process.

Everything you need to know about the revamped SAT and what it means for your teen.

With my oldest son just turning 10, I have a while to contemplate the college launch (gasp!) and furnishing a postage-stamp-sized dorm room.

College can be pricey, but that doesn’t mean you can’t find ways to save. We rounded up some of our favorite deals below.

Sending your child off to college is an emotional and practical balancing act that can throw off even the most even-keeled parent.

Pressure to get into the right college peaks in junior year. SATs are taken and retaken, colleges are visited, applications are filed and the waiting begins.

We are in the thick of AP testing in my house. The student—Cole—who is facing these exams is not known for his aggressive study habits.

  Big news about the SAT was revealed today. Even though my oldest kid is just 9, quite a few years away from applying to college, I took note.

  My son is conflicted about college: Does he want to go? If so, where? What should he study?

Send your teens off to college with our favorite finds.

Sending off a child to college? Use these checklists to discuss spending with your freshman — before she leaves and during the year.

Before your teen heads off to college, get prepared for the big move-in day with these essential packing and dorm-living tips.

Get extra credit by saving money on essential college supplies — check out our tips.

Your teen is moving on — and so should you. Learn to parent from afar during the college years.

Smart, sensible behavior can help keep your teen safe while away at college.

Send your teens off to college in style and get them the latest dorm room staples, cooking shortcuts and fun surprises to keep them ahead of the curve.

Did you see my column in the March issue on helping a teen network his way into college?

A sophomore at Emory University was recently arrested after allegedly accepting a fee of up to $2,500 to take the SATs for 6 high school students in Long Island.