Make Your Home Pet-Safe

Avoid these surprisingly common household hazards to keep your pets out of harm's way.


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Pet Caution Intro Slide

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Bookmark this slide slow to help make your home a safe zone for your pets.


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Pet Threat: Toxic Flowers and Plants

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Dogs


Why: Lilies, daffodils, holly and some greenery contain toxins that can be harmful to certain species if ingested.


Stay Safe: Visit aspca.org for a listing of safe and unsafe flowers and plants for your home.


 


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Video: Dog Expressions and What They Mean

Dog Expressions and What They Mean


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Pet Threat: Batteries

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Dogs


Why: Larger batteries pose a choking hazard, while smaller ones can leak battery acid and perforate the intestine once swallowed.


Stay Safe: Store batteries in a sealed container in a high cabinet.


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Video: Get Fit with Your Dog

Get Fit with Your Dog


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Pet Threat: Pennies

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Dogs


Why: The zinc can cause anemia if eaten.


Stay Safe: Transfer loose change to a tightly closed container.


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Video: How to Train a Dog with Kids

How to Train a Dog with Kids


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Pet Threat: Dryer Sheets

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Dogs (more commonly cats)


Why: Pets can choke on dryer sheets, which may obstruct the bowel if ingested.


Stay Safe: Dispose of used sheets in covered trash bins, and keep unused ones in their box out of easy reach.


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Pet Threat: Floss and Tread

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Dogs (more commonly cats) 


Why: Both can cause linear and twisting bowel obstruction.


Stay Safe: Throw away floss and thread in closed garbage bins.


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Pet Threat: Empty Cans

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Who They Hurt: Cats and Small Dogs


Why: When poking their heads in, pets can suffer cuts and bruises—or even get their heads stuck!


Stay Safe: Wash cans and crush them completely before placing in a covered recycling bin.


Story Source: John Tegzes, MA, VMD, Dipl. ABVT