Cindy Crawford’s Secrets to Staying Healthy—with Her Family

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Entrepreneur and supermodel Cindy Crawford is well aware of the influential power that comes with fame—just one of the reasons she joined forces with the Partnership for a Healthier America and spoke at their 2017 Summit. The goal: getting America’s kids healthier.

“As a celebrity you have a loud microphone,” says the media influencer and mother of two (Presley Walker, 17, and Kaia Jordan, 15). She also knows that you don’t have to grace the pages of fashion magazines to broadcast your message. “Really, every parent has that microphone in their own family. I know that my children watch what I do. So if they see me being philanthropic or getting involved in causes I care about, they will do that too. If they see me eating healthy and consciously, they will pick that up. If they see me exercising, they go, ‘Oh, I guess you just exercise.’”

And exercise she does. Crawford works out two to three times a week with a specific goal in mind: putting more pep in her runway step. “After I had kids, I realized my workouts had to give me energy,” she explains. “When I was in my 20s, I could do a really hard workout and then come home and lie on the couch for two hours. That’s not how it is when you have kids.” As a result, Crawford isn’t overdoing it on the cardio and weights, and she’s added Pilates to the mix. “It works your body in a different way and it’s more zen for me.”

Workouts also double as quality time with friends and family. “I go hiking with girlfriends because it’s a twofer: girlfriend therapy and exercise,” says Crawford. With her family, including husband of 19 years Rande Gerber, it’s a triathlon’s worth of events. “We live in Malibu, so we like to ride bikes and we go for hikes. Or if we’re somewhere the water is warm, we like to swim together.”

Surprisingly, going out for dinner is actually a way to keep the family spending focused time together. “Now that my kids are a little bit older we like to go out more, because sometimes when you eat at home it’s 15 minutes and then they’re off. Whereas if we take them out to dinner, we get an hour with them,” explains Crawford, who makes plenty of meals at home, including a turkey meatball dish that’s a crowd-pleaser.

One thing Crawford does daily: take a few minutes for herself first thing in the morning to spend time in nature and get centered. “No one has asked me for anything yet or needs anything from me,” she says. “Even when the kids were little, I would wake up extra early just to have that 15 minutes to be grateful and mentally run through my day so I can see where I might have hiccups.” Just a few moments in the morning to help her be her best self. Then she comes inside and pours a glass of green tea. “It’s just such a great way to start the day.”